Challenged Books in Iowa

ACLU

The ACLU of Iowa is dedicated to preserving our First Amendment to decide for ourselves what we read, view, and hear– a fundamental element of free speech and expression.

The American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom tracks books that have been challenged, often by parents of students, to be removed from public and school libraries. Classic books such as Brave New World and The Catcher in the Rye, and newer titles, such as the Gossip Girl series and Twilight, have been on “challenged” lists for reasons including explicit language, sexual content and violence.

Since 2005, the following books have been challenged in Iowa libraries because they contained sex, homosexuality, swear words, or mentions of suicide or drug use. We are happy to report that none of them were successfully removed.

See the list!!! : http://www.aclu-ia.org/challenged-books-in-iowa-banned-books-week-2013/

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CNN: ‘Captain Underpants’ tops list of challenged books

CNN Living
By Emanuella Grinberg and CNN Library, CNN
September 24, 2013

CaptainUnderpants(CNN) — What would you do if you went to the library in search of “The Adventures of Captain Underpants” for your child, or to re-read Toni Morrison’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Beloved” only to find that the book had been pulled from the shelves because another patron objected to its content?

It happens in the United States more often than many realize. At least 464 formal complaints were filed in 2012 seeking to remove books from libraries or schools, according to the American Library Association, a sponsor of Banned Books Week, which runs September 22-28. Its mission is to celebrate the freedom to read and highlight the pitfalls of censorship.

The annual event started in 1982, the same year the Supreme Court ruled that students’ First Amendment rights were violated when Kurt Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse-Five” and eight other books were removed from school libraries. Despite the legal precedent, schools and libraries still receive formal challenges to remove books from library shelves or nix them from reading lists to protect children from material some see as inappropriate.

Just this month, a North Carolina school board voted to ban Ralph Ellison’s “Invisible Man” based on complaints from the parent of an 11th-grader. The board is reportedly scheduled to reconsider its decision.

Read the the rest of the article: http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/24/living/banned-books-week/index.html

Forbes: Five Banned Books That You Should Read (That You Probably Haven’t)

Forbes
by Alex Knapp
September 23, 2013

Hadden,MarkThis week is Banned Books Week, where librarians and other organizations highlight the books that have been subjected to threats of censorship – and actual censorship – in schools, libraries and nations around the globe. Among the frequently challenged books include classics like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and popular books like The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. Many are books that you really ought to read, like Cat’s Cradle or Harry Potter. But then, you probably have read them – either because your school made you or because all your friends pushed them on you.

In between, though, are lots of books that you might not have heard of – or, at the very least, heard of but weren’t required to read when you were in school. With that in mind, I’ve created a list of five challenged or banned books that you probably haven’t read. Celebrate Banned Books Week by picking one up and giving it a read!

Our Family Tree: An Evolution Story by Lisa Westberg Peters

The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-time by Mark Haddon

Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo Galilei

Zhuangzi

The Epic of Gilgamesh

Find out why you should read these books (and why they were challenged or banned) in the full article: http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexknapp/2013/09/23/five-banned-books-that-you-should-read-that-you-probably-havent/

Famous Banned Books

Many people think that book banning is something that only happened in the past. But in 2011 alone, 326 attempts to ban books were made! Probably the most famous books banned in recent years were the Harry Potter and Twilight series. The reason given for censoring the phenomenally popular and seemingly harmless novels was that they promoted “unchristian magic.” ~www.factsmonster.com

Below is a list of books that have been banned, along with the reasons cited for banning them.

Book Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl
Reason Too depressing.
Book Blubber, by Judy Blume
Reason The characters curse and the mean-spirited ringleader is never punished for her cruelty.
Book Bony-Legs, by Joanna Cole
Reason Deals with subjects such as magic and witchraft.
Book The Chocolate War, by Robert Cormier
Reason Offensive language.
Book Confessions of an Only Child, by Norma Klein
Reason Use of profanity by the lead character’s father.
Book Harriet the Spy, by Louise Fitzhugh
Reason Teaches children to lie, spy, talk back, and curse.
Book Harry Potter books, by J. K. Rowling
Reason They promote witchcraft, set bad examples, and are too dark.
Book A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ but a Sandwich, by Alice Childress
Reason Anti-American and immoral.
Book The House without a Christmas Tree, by Gail Rock
Reason Uses the word damn.
Book In a Dark, Dark Room, and Other Scary Stories, by Alvin Schwartz
Reason Too morbid for children.
Book In the Night Kitchen, by Maurice Sendak
Reason Nudity; Mickey loses his pajamas during his fall in the kitchen.
Book A Light in the Attic, by Shel Silverstein
Reason A suggestive illustration that might encourage kids to break dishes so they won’t have to dry them.
Book Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, by William Steig
Reason The characters are all shown as animals; the police are presented as pigs.

List and quotes are from Fact Monster Database, copyright 2007 Pearson Education.
Find original page: http://www.factmonster.com/spot/banned-kids-books.html

Quote: Mildred D. Taylor

bookCover_TheLand“Although there are those who wish to ban my books because I have used language that is painful, I have chosen to use the language that was spoken during the period, for I refuse to whitewash history. The language was painful and life was painful for many African Americans, including my family.  I remember the pain.” ~Mildred D. Taylor, The Land